2013, Cheap Travel in India, Kerala travel, Odayam Beach, Travel in India, Varkala

The Garden

I wrote to someone the other day, as I sat by this placid seaside on Odayam Beach at Varkala–fishermen dragging in their nets and arguing with each other, Western tourists walking by, the air rushing in warm through the palms, “air you can kiss,” Kerouac said when he first reached California in 1947–that the days are an endless caress.

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Sunset at Fisherman’s Art Cafe, Varkala

I was content in the sweet wind and thud of long swells collapsing in celebratory foam, the fresh oranges at every market stall and long hands of tiny bananas, and I’ve made friendly acquaintance with Wahoub Budeen, whom I think of as the stout man in the little market booth south of the bizarrely named Fisherman’s Art Cafe—fishermen don’t go there, there is no art, and the people who run it, all from Darjeeling, lean on their hands most of every day, waiting for just one customer.

Budeen insists with a big hello that I buy biscuits, or oranges, or anything. Whatever the price he gives, I wave my arms and argue it should be five less, or sometimes, to his great amusement, I change direction and go from 40 to 50, having just gotten him down to 40.

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Wahoub Budeen at his market on the Odayam Beach Road, Varkala

And just beyond him on the dirt track, the poor, sad, rarely visited Karnatakan sellers of cloth — one man, two women, two small children who should be in school. One of the woman sells fruit; the other tries to sell their faded cotton cloth; the man sits grinning at me but says nothing. The fruit woman usually has a papaya or two, a pineapple, maybe a melon and three or four oranges or bananas for sale. I’ve not seen another customer stop there. She is hopeful when she sees me.

I bought from her a few days ago then walked on to Wahoub Budeen’s stall. He has many kilos of bananas for sale. No, I didn’t need any, I said, and showed him the three or four bananas I’d bought for 10 rupees.

I’d paid too much, he said. He’d charge half that.

Yeah, I said. I know, but… I tipped my head toward the sad people.

He stopped laughing. “Yes, yes,” he said. “Yes.” And he reached out and touched me on the shoulder.

Then he threw back his head again and laughed his big laugh. I needed biscuits, he said; oranges!

The days are regular. It gets light after six and and 12 hours later it’s dark. The mornings are beautiful and easy and then it heats up toward noon and after, with the hot sun coming straight down, and that’s when the water feels best, cool and soft-handed.

There are irritants. This is weird tourist India after all, where no one works very hard and the restaurant workers have no acquaintance with soap and garbage burning and unburned makes ditches bright and public ways all papery and discard littered.

Mostly, though, because as a visitor you have a few bucks and time to stretch and nothing much to do but luxuriate, unlike the natives, and slowly turn the pages of an Inspector Morse mystery, it is perfect — Dorothy Lamour walking off the black and white screen to lead you by the hand out of your familiar blaring world to a place of fantasy much like this.

Here is relief from collapsing institutions and corporate misanthropy, the political and cultural rot of my birth world. The Indian papers have not heard of fantasy football, and our public haters, slick-haired shouters, have no reach beyond our borders.

Perhaps it’s deserved indolence after decades in harness, I tell myself, but old habits are deeply ingrained and it came to me a week ago that I understood for the first time that ugly old story of  Adam and Eve. Given this, the garden, by a nagging, small-minded creator, they got bored.

To the sickly, dour church they are poster-children of  dejection and inadequacy, slinking away, cast out, rather than walking boldly into uncertainty, but I understood their drumming fingers.

I must move soon, even knowing I will look back.

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