2016, Cheap Travel in India, India and public health, Indian bathrooms and showers, Indian bureaucracy, Indian Press, Lack of toilets, Sanitation in India, Shitting by the road, The poor in India, Travel in India, Travel in Maharashtra

Kolhapur Hurrah! ODF!

I will be here to see it not happen.

Kolhapur will be the first Maharashtran city to “Achieve 100% Target,” the Times of India said yesterday (Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2016), referring to ODF, with funding coming from “corporate social responsibility initiatives” (the city) as well as the Swachh Bharat Abhiyan. It will happen by Republic Day on Jan. 26.

The Times of India, Jan. 19, 2016, p. 2

For those who have been living somewhere unplugged, “ODF” means “open defecation-free,” or, maybe, “open-defecation free.” Kolhapurians, by the end of the month will no longer PIP (Poop in Public).

The good word comes from Vijay Patil, Kolhapur’s chief sanitation inspector, who told the Times that four years ago over 1,150 families in the city of about 400,000 lacked a toilet, a number that has been reduced to 113 by “efforts undertaken through various goverment schemes and sensitising programmes.” He added that SBA (“Swachh Bharat Abhiyan” or “Clean India Mission”) money has been used to build public toilets for “around 27 families.” The story didn’t explain why that number was uncertain.

Public toilet, Kolhapur

SBA was begun by the Prime Minister a year ago and Kolhapur would have already made “the Smart City list,” but couldn’t last year, “owing to the open defecation cases.”

The story adds that 10 toilets for women have also been built on an unexplained BOT (“build operate and transfer”) scheme and plans are afoot for 20 more.

Mr. Patil didn’t detail the exact costs of each toilet, the drain on the city budget, the locations, or the style (Japanese modern? American standard? French pre-war?), and the Times didn’t ask. The story didn’t mention a CRPT (“Clean Reeking Public Toilets”) plan.

 

 

 

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